2019-12-22upper intermediate

Do Chinese Use “Ni Hao”? – HSK 4 Reading Practice

Try out this reading practice designed for HSK 4 learners. It's about the most well known Chinese greeting word: Ni Hao. There is a lot of debate that happens online about whether this is actually the right way to say hello or not. In the example sentences below we'll show you when it is and is not appropriate.

After you get done with these sentences, you'll find a link to our full lesson. You can also download the Du Chinese app to study hundreds of lessons all written for you current Chinese reading level.

Hover over any word to show translation
wǒ men
我们
我們
we, us
dōu
all, entirely
huì
can, to be able to
shuō
to say, to speak, to explain
 
nǐ hǎo
你好
你好
Hello!
 
”、“
nín hǎo
您好
您好
hello (polite)
 
”,
dàn
but, however
zài
(located) at, (to be) in
zhōng guó
中国
中國
China
 
rén men
人们
人們
people
zhēn de
真的
真的
really
dōu
all, entirely
yòng
to use
 
nǐ hǎo
你好
你好
Hello!
 
”、“
nín hǎo
您好
您好
hello (polite)
 
ma
(question particle for "yes-no" questions)
 

We all know how to say “ni hao”, and “nin hao”, but in China, do people really use “ni hao” and “nin hao”?

Character set
Pinyin
Hover over any word to show translation
(prefix indicating ordinal number, e.g. first, number two etc)
one
classifier for enumerated events: time
jiàn miàn
见面
見面
to meet, to see each other
 
wǒ men
我们
我們
we, us
huì
will
yòng
to use
 
nǐ hǎo
你好
你好
Hello!
 
”,
also, too
yòng
to use
 
nín hǎo
您好
您好
hello (polite)
 
”。
dàn
but, however
rú guǒ
如果
如果
if, in case
shì
is, are
péng you
朋友
朋友
friend
jiàn miàn
见面
見面
to meet, to see each other
 
rén men
人们
人們
people
hěn
very
shǎo
few, seldom
yòng
to use
 
nǐ hǎo
你好
你好
Hello!
 
”,
rén men
人们
人們
people
xǐ huan
喜欢
喜歡
to like, to be fond of
yòng
to use
 
chī fàn
吃饭
吃飯
to have a meal, to eat
le
(completed action marker)
ma
(question particle for "yes-no" questions)
 
”、“
to go, to go to (a place)
nǎ'r
哪儿
哪兒
where
 
”,
huò zhě
或者
或者
or
jiào
to call, to shout, to be called
duì fāng
对方
對方
counterpart, other side
de
~'s (possessive particle)
míng zi
名字
名字
name (of a person or thing)
 

The first time you meet someone, we use “ni hao”, and also use “nin hao”. But when two friends meet, people very seldom use “ni hao”. People like to use “Have you eaten?”, “Where are you going?”, or calling out the other person's name.

Character set
Pinyin
Hover over any word to show translation
bǐ rú
比如
比如
for example
lín jū
邻居
鄰居
neighbor, next door
jiàn miàn
见面
見面
to meet, to see each other
kě néng
可能
可能
possible, probable
huì
will
shuō
to say, to speak, to explain
 
 
chī
to eat
le
(completed action marker)
ma
(question particle for "yes-no" questions)
 
?”
 
chī
to eat
le
(completed action marker)
 
you (informal)
ne
particle indicating that a previously asked question is to be applied to the preceding word ("What about ...?", "And ...?")
 
 
 
méi
(negative prefix for verbs), have not
chī
to eat
 
děng
to wait for, to await
huì'r
会儿
會兒
a moment, a little while
to go, to go to (a place)
chī
to eat
 
。”

For example if two neighbors meet they might say: “Did you eat yet?” “I did. What about you?” “No, I'll go eat something in a while.”

Character set
Pinyin

To read the entire lesson you can click here

If you'd like another HSK 4 level reading practice try this lesson